ADROITA and BecTech sign Memorandum of Understanding

ADROITA and BecTech, both female owned and led engineering consultancies serving the defence sector, have today signed a Memorandum of Understanding that will deepen defence cooperation between Australia and the USA in light of the recent AUKUS pact. The partnership deal was inked to formalise an existing relationship between the two companies to share knowledge and work to support critical defence maritime programs. The formal agreement aims to capitalise on the melding of local maritime acquisition and through-life-support know-how and experience, and international naval, combat systems, and systems integration engineering best practice.

The relationship sets both companies up to not only jointly support existing naval programs and capabilities such as the Hobart Class Air Warfare Destroyer Aegis Weapon System upgrade (SEA4000 Phase 6), undersea surveillance programs, and Hobart Class Air Warfare Destroyer sustainment; but to also leverage the scientific and engineering developments potentially generated by AUKUS. ADROITA and BecTech will be equipped to jointly provide vital support to Defence when Australia and the USA formalise technology sharing arrangements under the AUKUS deal. This includes highly specialised engineering and technical support to Australia’s acquisition of and transition to a nuclear-powered submarine capability, as well as long range strike weapons, hypersonics, artificial intelligence, emerging undersea capabilities, submarine construction yard design and delivery, and ordnance facility design.

ADROITA will bring deep local experience and expertise in maritime acquisition and sustainment and specialist operations, combat systems, systems integration and lifecycle management knowledge to the partnership. BecTech will contribute in-depth weapons and combat system design and systems integration expertise, their proven experience in the management of complex US weapons and naval programs, submarine construction yard experience with the SEA1000 Future Submarine program, and the construction, testing and operations of nuclear-powered submarines.

ADROITA CEO Ms Sarah Pavillard said, “I’m delighted about transforming ADROITA’s relationship with BecTech into a partnership that will deliver real results to Defence, with our first joint project commencing this week. This partnership will increase Defence cooperation between Australia and the USA, will strengthen Australia’s sovereign combat systems engineering and integration capability, and is another example of ADROITA realising our core purpose of Engineering Success for Sovereign Capability.”

BecTech VP International Programs Mike Fierro said, “It is great to be back in Australia, and it is an exciting time to be here with so many important programs underway. Our relationship with ADROITA reflects our continuing commitment to contribute to Defence’s capability and capacity and in a way that promotes Australian Industry Capability. We look forward to expanding our opportunities to bring Innovative Concepts for the Future to the Commonwealth through this relationship.”

BecTech joins ADROITA in Australia this week to kick off a work package to plan a complex technical activity for the Department of Defence.

ADROITA is an award-winning consultancy, and was founded in 2016 by Ms Pavillard, a Navy Weapons Engineer and Navy veteran. Since then ADROITA has developed a reputation for delivering innovative solutions to complex challenges for Defence and Australian SMEs. With a growing team and expertise across multiple engineering and other professional services domains, ADROITA is well positioned to support Defence and leverage the technologies that AUKUS will enable.

BecTech was founded in 1997 by Mrs Rebecca Sutton, a Combat System Test and Evaluation expert, with Bob Wilson, a guided weapons and combat systems expert, and is a privately held engineering, program management, and professional services company supporting US Navy, Missile Defense Agency, and International Navy Programs, including in Australia.

If you are interested in partnering with ADROITA or exploring our engineering services contact us

ADROITA launches new white paper at 2021 Land Forces Event

ADROITA is proud to announce the Hon. Stuart Ayers, MP, Minister for Jobs, Investment, Tourism and Western Sydney, launches CEO, Sarah Pavillard’s white paper ‘Partnering for Success’ at Land Forces Defence Expo on 1st June 2021.

In this white paper Sarah shares strategies for how engineering, manufacturing and technology firms can break down the barriers to entry and enable Defence and SMEs to partner to achieve a common goal.

“I am delighted launch my latest white paper ‘Partnering for Success’ at Land Forces 2021 with the support of the NSW Government and Investment NSW,” says Sarah Pavillard.

“The increase in Defence spending and the Federal government’s commitment to making the Australian Defence industry base more resilient and self-reliant to better support Defence is a once-in-a-generation opportunity for Aussie SMEs to not only futureproof themselves but contribute to Australia’s national interests. 

“No-one can do it alone. Partnering is key and that is what this white paper is all about,” said Sarah.

Sarah goes on to explain the strategies in this white paper are not just theories but have been tried and tested. 

“These strategies that my team and I have put in place for Australian SMEs are delivering results today, as clients can access to tens of millions of dollars of new revenue, all while unlocking new industry capability to support Defence in the future,” says Sarah.

In 2020, the Australian Government put $270 billion in acquisition budget, approximately $180B in sustainment budget, and $575 billion in total over 10 years, on the table for Defence to invest. 

It also strengthened its commitment to spending with Australian industry, with the Defence spending forecast to flow to Australian businesses increasing three- to six-fold over the next 10 years. 

That’s a total of up to $11.5B per annum for Australian industry, including SMEs, to grow their business. 

Historically, the challenge for Australian businesses accessing the Defence sector is that it is a closed shop, extremely complex, and takes too long.

Sarah Pavillard and the team at ADROITA opens those doors, simplifying Defence, and fast tracking new, profitable revenue to futureproof Australian businesses and to build the industrial capability the Australian Defence Force needs to secure Australia’s sovereign interests. 

Download our ‘Partnering for Success’ White Paper here.

ADROITA CEO champions women leaders with the FACCI

In the June 2021 edition of Australian Defence Magazine, our CEO, Sarah Pavillard, explains the key to delivering a truly capable ADF and securing Australia’s future is for Australian manufacturing businesses and Defence to join forces to unlock latent Sovereign Industrial Capability.

Take a moment to consider the challenges facing Australian businesses right now, particularly in the technology and manufacturing sectors. For some, the challenges are existential. Many have hit a major slump. Their key market, oil and gas, is not just contracting, it’s tanking. They believed that key customers would never shut down, but in 2020 – the year of COVID-19 and devastating bushfires and floods – many of them did. Now, more than ever, Australian businesses need to secure supply chains and become more resilient. Thankfully, sovereignty and resilience are now well and truly on the national agenda – not only because of policy tweaks responding to the triple-shock fire, flood, COVID crises, but also because it’s in Australia’s strategic interests to do so.

A force for good

The Australian government detailed a new approach in its 2020 Defence Strategic Update and 2020 Force Structure Plan, evolving the strategy set in the 2016 Defence White Paper. This update identified key changes in Australia’s strategic circumstances, most notably that:

  • The most important strategic realignment since WWII is happening in the Indo-Pacific (Australia’s neighbourhood) right now.
  • The potential for high intensity conflict, whilst still unlikely, is increasing.
  • We no longer have a 10-year strategic warning time for that potential conflict, therefore, Defence planning has to change.

This new approach recognises the need to grow ‘the ADF’s self-reliance for delivering deterrent effects’ and sets as a priority ‘more durable supply chain arrangements and strengthened sovereign industrial capabilities to enhance the ADF’s self-reliance’. Defence is pivoting to respond to this rapidly changing and increasingly complex international strategic environment, with government committing $270 billion over the next 10 years to fund investment in support of the future force’s capability required to meet these challenges. The government is driving Defence to deliver on its commitments to industry, and is now co-funding up to 80 per cent of key grants for capability or capital improvement by Australian businesses, which will improve their ability to deliver within the Defence industry sector and meet Sovereign Industrial Capability Priorities.

What may be holding things back?

The issues that we at ADROITA hear each and every day about the challenges facing Australian businesses and emerging Defence industry, and the Department of Defence as well, can be distilled into three issues:

  • The cost (time and money) is too high. Most Australian businesses end up at a stand-still when first considering Defence because they know it is going to take time and money, and they lack confidence about how to make it happen in a way that will make the investment worthwhile.
  • Partnering is extremely complex. Any business facing the challenge of accessing Defence for the first time, or the challenge of growing one or two existing capabilities into a bigger program of delivery to Defence, faces very high levels of complexity.
  • Both sides are a closed shop. From the outside looking in, Defence truly is a closed shop. The networks are tight, and have formed over decades. Defence has a complex ecosystem of different procurement divisions, global prime contractors, a research and development agenda, and long-term industry partnerships, so understanding who will drive the demand for the business’s products and services is challenging at best.

How do we move it out of the ‘too-hard basket’ for Defence and business?

Defence has established a clear agenda for enabling the ADF to achieve its future outcomes, and mapping a business’s capability and capacity across these high level requirements is a critical first step. It requires imagination and vision – both on behalf of the business, but also Defence.

  • Capability and capacity. Identifying business’s capability and capacity, in consideration of what Defence needs, is key. Defence doesn’t just want to buy an existing product – it wants what lies beneath the ability to create that product or deliver that service.
  • Defence needs. Most businesses taking the journey towards being a Defence supplier need to pivot their thinking. Defence is a needs-driven organisation, and the standards required to deliver into Defence are amongst the highest in industry – for good reason.
  • Sovereign Industrial Capability Priorities (SICPs). Defence is willing to pay a premium for Australian goods and services – in fact, it is strategically imperative, as outlined in the Defence Industrial Capability Plan.
  • R&D Agenda. The R&D agenda is the final piece of the puzzle, and in some instances it’s the hardest piece to identify for a business. However, unlocking capability to participate in the Defence R&D space, offers businesses the opportunity to offset the cost of investing in cutting-edge research to solve future Defence problems – and at the same time evolve their own business offering.

Partnering to unlock potential

It’s clear that fast-tracking success across Defence in the rapidly changing strategic environment can only occur through partnerships – but collaboration is just the start. Partnership implies so much more than ‘working together to achieve an outcome’ – it requires mutual respect and recognition of skills and capability, implicit trust, a relationship of necessary equals, and a focus on solutions. Not only do businesses open doors to different revenue streams within the Defence sector (contracts vs grants), but they open the door to future proofing their entire business, whilst supporting Defence to future proof Australia’s sovereign interests. Hence, it’s a win-win for all.

ADROITA partners with University of Sydney

In the June 2021 edition of Australian Defence Magazine, our CEO, Sarah Pavillard, explains the key to delivering a truly capable ADF and securing Australia’s future is for Australian manufacturing businesses and Defence to join forces to unlock latent Sovereign Industrial Capability.

Take a moment to consider the challenges facing Australian businesses right now, particularly in the technology and manufacturing sectors. For some, the challenges are existential. Many have hit a major slump. Their key market, oil and gas, is not just contracting, it’s tanking. They believed that key customers would never shut down, but in 2020 – the year of COVID-19 and devastating bushfires and floods – many of them did. Now, more than ever, Australian businesses need to secure supply chains and become more resilient. Thankfully, sovereignty and resilience are now well and truly on the national agenda – not only because of policy tweaks responding to the triple-shock fire, flood, COVID crises, but also because it’s in Australia’s strategic interests to do so.

A force for good

The Australian government detailed a new approach in its 2020 Defence Strategic Update and 2020 Force Structure Plan, evolving the strategy set in the 2016 Defence White Paper. This update identified key changes in Australia’s strategic circumstances, most notably that:

  • The most important strategic realignment since WWII is happening in the Indo-Pacific (Australia’s neighbourhood) right now.
  • The potential for high intensity conflict, whilst still unlikely, is increasing.
  • We no longer have a 10-year strategic warning time for that potential conflict, therefore, Defence planning has to change.

This new approach recognises the need to grow ‘the ADF’s self-reliance for delivering deterrent effects’ and sets as a priority ‘more durable supply chain arrangements and strengthened sovereign industrial capabilities to enhance the ADF’s self-reliance’. Defence is pivoting to respond to this rapidly changing and increasingly complex international strategic environment, with government committing $270 billion over the next 10 years to fund investment in support of the future force’s capability required to meet these challenges. The government is driving Defence to deliver on its commitments to industry, and is now co-funding up to 80 per cent of key grants for capability or capital improvement by Australian businesses, which will improve their ability to deliver within the Defence industry sector and meet Sovereign Industrial Capability Priorities.

What may be holding things back?

The issues that we at ADROITA hear each and every day about the challenges facing Australian businesses and emerging Defence industry, and the Department of Defence as well, can be distilled into three issues:

  • The cost (time and money) is too high. Most Australian businesses end up at a stand-still when first considering Defence because they know it is going to take time and money, and they lack confidence about how to make it happen in a way that will make the investment worthwhile.
  • Partnering is extremely complex. Any business facing the challenge of accessing Defence for the first time, or the challenge of growing one or two existing capabilities into a bigger program of delivery to Defence, faces very high levels of complexity.
  • Both sides are a closed shop. From the outside looking in, Defence truly is a closed shop. The networks are tight, and have formed over decades. Defence has a complex ecosystem of different procurement divisions, global prime contractors, a research and development agenda, and long-term industry partnerships, so understanding who will drive the demand for the business’s products and services is challenging at best.

How do we move it out of the ‘too-hard basket’ for Defence and business?

Defence has established a clear agenda for enabling the ADF to achieve its future outcomes, and mapping a business’s capability and capacity across these high level requirements is a critical first step. It requires imagination and vision – both on behalf of the business, but also Defence.

  • Capability and capacity. Identifying business’s capability and capacity, in consideration of what Defence needs, is key. Defence doesn’t just want to buy an existing product – it wants what lies beneath the ability to create that product or deliver that service.
  • Defence needs. Most businesses taking the journey towards being a Defence supplier need to pivot their thinking. Defence is a needs-driven organisation, and the standards required to deliver into Defence are amongst the highest in industry – for good reason.
  • Sovereign Industrial Capability Priorities (SICPs). Defence is willing to pay a premium for Australian goods and services – in fact, it is strategically imperative, as outlined in the Defence Industrial Capability Plan.
  • R&D Agenda. The R&D agenda is the final piece of the puzzle, and in some instances it’s the hardest piece to identify for a business. However, unlocking capability to participate in the Defence R&D space, offers businesses the opportunity to offset the cost of investing in cutting-edge research to solve future Defence problems – and at the same time evolve their own business offering.

Partnering to unlock potential

It’s clear that fast-tracking success across Defence in the rapidly changing strategic environment can only occur through partnerships – but collaboration is just the start. Partnership implies so much more than ‘working together to achieve an outcome’ – it requires mutual respect and recognition of skills and capability, implicit trust, a relationship of necessary equals, and a focus on solutions. Not only do businesses open doors to different revenue streams within the Defence sector (contracts vs grants), but they open the door to future proofing their entire business, whilst supporting Defence to future proof Australia’s sovereign interests. Hence, it’s a win-win for all.